Pumpkin Broccoli Soup: The Healthiest Soup Ever?


Healthiest Soup Ever

This pumpkin and broccoli soup recipe is creamy, deliciously tasty and extremely healthy.

It’s by far the nicest way I’ve found to eat broccoli and, aside from the beta-carotene rich pumpkin, it also has garlic and turmeric for extra antioxidant kick, bell pepper for vitamin C, coconut oil and milk for healthy medium chain fatty acids and optional pumpkin seed oil for its amazing health benefits.

Pumpkin Broccoli Soup Ingredients for 2

  • 1 small pumpkin or half a large one (small pumpkins usually taste better)
  • A medium sized head of broccoli (yes the whole thing – you won’t taste it that much)
  • 1 large bell pepper
  • 6 spring onions (or one medium onion)
  • 1 teaspoon of organic coconut oil
  • 3 cloves of crushed garlic
  • A splash of fermented soy sauce
  • Cracked pepper to taste

How to Make Broccoli and Pumpkin Soup

  1. Start by removing the pumpkin seeds and cutting your pumpkin into roughly 2 inch-wide strips. Steam it with a lid on and medium heat for around 12 minutes until a fork goes easily through to near the skin.
  2. Pull off the broccoli florets and slice the center part into strips so none of them are too thick. Remove the stem and seeds from the bell pepper and give it a wash. Five minutes into the pumpkin steaming, add the broccoli florets and bell pepper for the remaining time.
  3. Diced up your spring onions or onion and lightly fried them on a medium heat in the coconut oil for around two minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the crushed garlic and turmeric and stir briefly until mixed in and all orange. Add the coconut milk, soy sauce and cracked pepper and briefly simmer on low heat with a lid on.
  4. Once the pumpkin, broccoli and bell pepper are done, move the steamer to a chopping board and take the broccoli and bell pepper out first and pop them straight into your blender. Add the orange spring onion and coconut milk mix and give it a quick blend. These blend up really smooth if you give them a quick pulse first before adding the pumpkin in my experience.
  5. Scoop out the pumpkin flesh from the strips on a chopping board taking care with the hot skin. Don’t worry about going right to the skin. The healthiest part of the pumpkin is where it’s brightest orange and that is usually in the center.
  6. Add the pumpkin strips to the blender and blend all the ingredients again until smooth and creamy. You can add a some hot water from your steamer if you’d like it to be a little less thick.
  7. Serve piping hot into bowls straight from the blender and enjoy your pumpkin broccoli soup immediately. If you have pumpkin seed oil, a swirl or zigzag pattern over the top just before eating adds an interesting nutty flavor and even more health nutrients.

Please let me know what you think of this healthy pumpkin broccoli soup recipe if you make it up for yourself in the comments below.

Photo: girl_onthe_les

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Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 6 comments
JayX

Presumably you added the steaming water to the soup too?? Without it – it would be incredibly thick – even before you add the pumpkin! I can’t believe that I cup of coconut milk is the only liquid?!

Reply
    Jim

    Hi there,

    You can certainly add some of the steaming water to make a more watery soup but I make this up regularly and it makes a good thick soup with just well blended pumpkin and other vegetables with the coconut milk.

    All the best,

    Jim

    Reply
Bets

Ok, I realize that pumpkin is good for you –

BUT is there a pumpkin recipe that Does NOT taste like pumpkin – because I can’t stand it….

Reply
    Jim

    Hi there,

    I don’t think this soup recipe tastes too much like pumpkin. If you make up a soup like this with other vegetables the pumpkin should just give a great texture without too much flavor. Spices also help change the flavor.

    Hope this helps,

    Jim

    Reply
pat

Could I substitute can pumpkin in this recipe? If so who much?
I live in the Middle East and it is hard to get fresh pumpkins and when I find them they are very very expensive.

Reply
    Jim

    Hi Pat,

    Yes you could. For the large amounts here probably about 2 cans.

    All the best,

    James

    Reply

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